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Research Themes

Housing and planning sit at the heart of many wider social issues. CCHPR's research is dedicated to understanding and tackling social and spatial inequalities, and our team of researchers work on multiple projects spread across a range of housing and housing-related research topics. Our research is relevant for both policy and practice, and we look to provide an evidence base for making positive changes through reducing inequality, improving housing conditions and improving housing affordability.

Housing Policy, Regulation & Evaluation

Leasehold and Freehold Charges
This research, funded by the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG), will examine the issues of the levels of leasehold and freehold charges being charged, and the variation within these, in order to inform the development of the Ministry's leasehold reform policy and future programme.
Developing income-linked rents for CHS Group
Joseph Rowntree Foundation and CHS Group have commissioned CCHPR to explore how CHS Group can set rents that are genuinely affordable for its clients. This research will inform CHS’s policy on rent setting beyond 2020 and, at this opportune time, provide an opportunity to influence sector thinking and relevant government policy.
Planning for Affordable Housing (PLANAFFHO)
Dr Sónia Alves's project PLANAFFHO, funded by a two year Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellowship, examined how land use planning contributes to the provision of affordable housing for people on low incomes, and how it has promoted a mix of housing tenures within new developments in three European capital cities - Copenhagen, Lisbon and London - since 2007.
Using incentives to improve the private rented sector for people in poverty
The Joseph Rowntree Foundation commissioned CCHPR to investigate how to improve the English private rented sector as a source of accommodation for people in poverty. The project explored whether taxation could be used to incentivise private landlords to improve the affordability, conditions or security of rented housing.
Research into Letting Agents Fees to Tenants in Wales
The Welsh Government funded CCHPR's research into fees charged to tenants in the private rented sector across Wales
Shared housing for non-resident parents
Commonweal Housing has funded the Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research to research the housing needs and views of non-resident parents who live, or have considered living, in shared housing.
Modelling the impact of taxation reform on the PRS
Significant policy changes affecting the private rented sector have the potential for a serious impact on the centre as the majority of landlords face increased taxation. The Residential Landlords Association commissioned research to develop an economic model of the finances of PRS landlords and property investors in order to identify the wider impact of the recent taxation reforms.
Provision of expert advice on UK Housing Statistics
CCHPR provided expert advice to the Regulatory Arm of the UK Statistics Authority in its review of Housing Statistics.
Government Policy and the Profile of Housing Provision in England
CCHPR were commissioned by Places for People to explore the impact on government policy on the profile of housing provision in England. It will consider the impact of the Housing and Planning Bill and other reforms to welfare, housing and planning policy on the social and affordable housing sector in England.
Feasibility study of the prospect of developing a viable housing model for those entitled only to access the shared accommodation rate
Community Housing Cymru and the Welsh Local Government Association have commissioned CCHPR to undertake a study into viable housing models for single people only entitled to the housing benefit shared accommodation rate.
Consultancy input into Evaluation of the JRF’s Housing and Poverty Programme
Anna Clarke worked with Cambridge Policy Consultants as an advisor on their evaluation of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation’s Housing and Poverty Programme.
Refining the recent release of the ONS ‘Travel-To-Work Areas’ for housing planning purposes
This project objective was to refine the ONS Travel-To-Work Areas for Cambridge to make them more appropriate for housing planning purposes.
How do landlords address poverty? A poverty-focused review of the stratetgies of local authorities, landlords and letting agents in England
Rising rents, more low‑income households in private renting, reduced funding for house building and welfare reforms present major challenges for landlords and local authorities in England. This research explores how landlords are responding, what can be learnt from their written strategies and plans, and what happens in practice.
Understanding the likely poverty impacts of the extension of Right to Buy to housing association tenants
This short piece of research, commissioned by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation aimed to better understand likely poverty impacts of the extension of Right to Buy to housing associations and the associated sale of higher value local authority stock.
Downsizing and moving in later life - new build housing or existing stock?
This research explored why older households move in later life, the size of property they moved to and why they choose either new build housing or existing stock. It considered what the house building sector can learn from their experience and what opportunities that this presents to the house building sector.
Research on the effect of rent stabilisation measures in London
The London Assembly’s Housing Committee undertook an investigation in autumn 2015 into the likely impact of a range of rent stabilisation measures on London’s housing market.
Designing compliance into regulatory codes
For this project Dr Paul Sanderson (supported by Daniel Banks and Prof. Simon Deakin) worked alongside BRDO staff in their offices, contributing from previous research knowledge on optimising compliance to (i) the design of regulatory codes, and (ii) communications about regulatory codes, affect approaches to compliance.
The effects of rent controls on supply and markets
This project, commissioned by Shelter, explored the possible effects of different rent control scenarios on the operation of the Private Rented Sector in England. Six different rent control options were considered, proposing different limits to rents and changes to security of tenure.
Increasing housing supply: Research to support Lloyds Banking Group’s Housing Commission
This project provided evidence to support the Housing Commission in exploring what works to increase housing supply. It looked at a range of policy measures such as New Towns, bringing empty homes back into use, self build and custom build, the role of taxation in promoting housing supply and affordability, different models of delivering affordable housing and ways of increasing overall housing production. It started with a policy and practice overview and produced an Interim Report in time to encourage discussion and debate at the party political conferences. It included consideration of regional and devolved government and concluded with recommendations.
Research into potential solutions for business data sharing between regulators
This project for the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills drew on existing knowledge of regulation and regulatory data within the CCHPR to examine the potential for greater sharing of regulatory data between regulators. The aim was to increase regulatory efficiency and reduce the burden of regulation on business.
Promoting policy change to boost the supply of affordable housing
The project sought to influence (a) public policy on affordable housing supply policy instruments and (b) public understanding of policy measures that would increase the supply of affordable housing through the production of a short film, a policy workshop, and engagement with politicians and the general public.
Benefit Cap: In-depth interviews with affected claimants
The DWP commissioned CCHPR to undertake a series of qualitative interviews with households affected by the Benefit Cap.
Local public finance and housing policy conference. Presentation by Dr Gemma Burgess - Case Study UK: rising house prices and under supply
Dr Gemma Burgess gave a key note speech at the local public finance and housing policy conference in Israel in December 2014, hosted by the Gazit-Globe Real Estate Institute at IDC Herzliya. The presentation - Case Study UK: rising house prices and under supply – focuses on housing supply constraints.
Housing Supply– challenges for policy makers. Presentation by Dr Gemma Burgess to the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Social Science and Policy, 21 October 2014, House of Commons
Dr Gemma Burgess gave a presentation to the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Social Science and Policy, 21 October 2014, at the House of Commons as part of the session on Housing Supply– challenges for policy makers. The presentation focuses on the constraints on new housing supply.
Housing costs, affordability and rent setting
Affinity Sutton commissioned this work from CCHPR to update and build on the definitions of affordability discussed in previous work on market-pegged social rents and local income distributions to determine rent levels that may be deemed affordable according to local incomes and/or earnings, taking account of the impact of geography, household size/composition and the current changes in welfare benefits.
Review of Affordable Housing Gateway in Jersey
The States of Jersey commissioned CCHPR to undertake a full and independent review to ensure that the then new Affordable Housing Gateway, launched in January 2012, was supported appropriately in respect of policy, process and procedures; that it was appropriately resourced (both staff and IT) and that itw as as efficient as it could be and was fit for purpose. The work used a ‘lean methodology’ that combined data analysis with interviews with staff and clients and comparison with best practice in the UK.
Evaluation of the Removal of the Spare Room Subsidy and household Benefit Cap
This evaluation sought to understand the impact of the size criteria on claimants, landlords and other stakeholders and to explore how households responded to the reduction in their benefits.
Qualitative study on the impact of welfare reforms on Riverside tenants
Riverside Housing undertook a study with the aim of gaining a more detailed understanding of the impact of welfare reforms and wider economic change on Riverside households. Anna Clarke, from CCHPR, was an advisor on the project.
Support in the preparation of a housing strategy for Jersey
The States of Jersey commissioned CCHPR to provide support to its embryonic Strategic Housing unit in the preparation of an island wide, cross tenure Housing Strategy. The project comprises a series of papers for discussion with officers and the relevant Ministers between November 2012 and April 2013, leading to the production of a public Consulation Paper for circulation in May and a final Strategy Paper for debate in the States Assembly in June/July 2013. It identified the main issues and options in order to built a shared understanding of the issues, the range of policy options available and the financial implications. The aim of the project was to develop a broad consensus on the appropriate housing strategy for Jersey.
Research into the future of the social rented sector
This project was commissioned by East 7, a group of housing associations in the East of England, to inform their own strategy and policy development and to assist East 7 members in engaging in the policy debate with ministers and other opinion formers.

Planning Obligations & the Planning System

Valuing Planning Obligations 2018-19
CCHPR researchers are participating in a collaborative project looking at developer contributions
Land value capture evidence published by House of Commons
Research commissioned by MHCLG is cited in report to the Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee, as published by the House of Commons.
The Incidence, Value and Delivery of Planning Obligations and Community Infrastructure Levy in England in 2016-17 (Inquiry)
Planning for Affordable Housing (PLANAFFHO)
Dr Sónia Alves's project PLANAFFHO, funded by a two year Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellowship, examined how land use planning contributes to the provision of affordable housing for people on low incomes, and how it has promoted a mix of housing tenures within new developments in three European capital cities - Copenhagen, Lisbon and London - since 2007.
Valuing Planning Obligations
CCHPR participated in a collaborative project entitled Research into the Incidence and Value of S106 and CIL. Led by the University of Liverpool, the project was funded by the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government.
Performance bonds for highways and water supplies for new housing developments
The NHBC, together with the NHBC Foundation, commissioned this research project to investigate the circumstances and consequences of performance bonds required by highways authorities and water supply companies for housing developments. The NHBC estimates that it is the provider of 80% of the outstanding bonds in the sector.
Research on the nature of planning constraints
The aim of this research was to analyse the nature of planning constraints on the provision of housing. The research was commissioned by the House of Commons Communities and Local Government Committee.
Land Use Planning and the Production of Affordable Housing
This project, funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, TSA (then Housing Corporation), Countryside Agency, RICS and RTPI, explored the operation of s106 in producing additional affordable housing.
Value for Money of s106 in Providing Additional Affordable Housing
This study was commissioned by DCLG (then ODPM) as a parallel to the work on s106 and SHG funded by JRF and TSA (then the Housing Corporation). The work involved analysis of TSA and DCLG data, case studies, interviews with developers and housing associations and analysis of site specific financial information. The interim report fed into the consultation on an optional charge for affordable housing. Like other projects on s106, Sheffield collaborated on the work. The report has been published both in hard copy and on the DCLG web site.
Delivering affordable housing through s106: outputs and outcomes
There is anecdotal evidence that what is finally delivered on the ground through s106 may be different from what was originally negotiated – for example, a large site may be broken up and sold to different developers who may re-negotiate the S106 affordable housing provision. The project aimed to assess whether affordable housing is being lost or modified through negotiated changes to the initial agreed S106 as well as through non take-up of planning permission; and to gain an understanding of why this is happening and of patterns of behaviour. The project was undertaken jointly with the University of Sheffield.
The complementary roles of Social Housing Grant and affordable housing through the planning system in achieving additional affordable housing
This study compares the provision of new affordable housing via S106 with the 'traditional' approach whereby housing associations develop land with the aid of Housing Corporation funding. It looks at costs and additionality and finds that s106 is replacing the traditional approach, largely because it is an important means of accessing land for housing associations.
S106 Affordable Housing Provision: What is Going On?
This project aimed to find out what was happening on the ground to S106 negotiations and affordable housing delivery in a context of considerable uncertainty in the national and regional regulatory framework.
Forecasting and Managing Planning Obligations for Developer Contributions to Affordable Housing: A Feasibility Study
This feasibility study into how to improve the performance of S106 in delivering additional affordable housing comprised a policy and data review of the South West region, stakeholder interviews at national, regional and local levels, and four case studies from within the South West’s housing market areas.
Delivering affordable housing through the planning system in Wales
This project involved organising three training seminars in North and South Wales in May 2007 to inform local authority officers about the suite of material produced by the Welsh Assembly Government designed to improve their delivery of affordable housing through the planning system. A report on the seminars was produced for publication in November 2007.
Planning and affordable housing Member Training and Development Programme
This project delivered a training programme in negotiating affordable housing through S106 to elected members, particularly those with housing and planning portfolios. The work involved three seminars in North, Central and South Wales.
Promoting mixed communities through balanced lettings and asset management
The aims of the project, carried out for the Tenant Services Authority and Communities and Local Government, were to understand how to achieve a better balance between allocating social homes to the most needy, and preserving or improving the mix of the housing stock, in particular through balanced lettings and asset management policies. The project conducted 30 qualitative interviews with Chief Executives of RSLs and ALMOs and local authority Directors of Housing.
Good practice guide to delivering new affordable housing on S106 sites
The project aimed to explore current local planning authority practice, in order to identify which aspects contributed to the successful delivery of affordable housing on S106 sites.
Common starting points for S106 affordable housing negotiations
Communities and Local Government commissioned a two-stage research project to improve evidence on the dynamics of S106 negotiations for affordable housing and to explore what the best ‘common starting point’ (CSP) might be.
Practice guidance on affordable housing clauses in Section 106 agreements for local planning authorities in Wales
Through this project the Welsh Assembly Government aimed to provide practice guidance for local authorities in Wales on the drafting and application of affordable housing clauses in Section 106 (S106) agreements.
Improving the capacity of the planning system
This project comprised a series of regional round table discussions in the North, Midlands, East, South, London and Wales to assess the capacity of the planning system to deliver the government’s housing targets in sustainable communities and to make practical recommendations for improvement.
Further practice guidance on using Section 106 agreements to secure affordable housing during the economic downturn
The economic downturn has raised serious questions about the delivery of housing targets and the capacity of the planning system to deliver affordable housing. The Welsh Assembly Government wished to provide further guidance on the use of S106 agreements to secure affordable housing during the downturn.
Contributing to the political debate on planning and affordable housing
This project, commissioned by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation aimed to understand in more detail the range of instruments that are proposed as means of achieving both local empowerment and higher levels of market and affordable housing and to clarify the potential benefits and costs of moving to a more incentives based system.
Input into the consultation on the abolition of the Regional Spatial Strategies
CCHPR were commissioned by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation to assist in submitting their consultation response for the inquiry into the abolition of regional spatial strategies. The consultation focussing particularly on the implications for house building.
The future of inclusive design: the success of initiatives aiming to reduce inequality in spatial planning and the built environment
The aim of the research was to explore the success of equality-related initiatives in the field of spatial planning and the built environment. CCHPR worked with Women’s Design Groups, Disability Access Groups and Inclusive Design Groups.
The impact of the recent financial crisis on planning for affordable housing in England
This research aimed to identify: (1) how S106 was being used in very different market conditions and whether it could still work to deliver sufficient affordable housing; (2) how preparations for new policies that wpuld affect affordable housing delivery, such as the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL), had been altered by the recent financial crisis; (3) what alternative approaches were being considered or used for the delivery of affordable housing.
Estimating the impacts of the changes in S106 with the introduction of CIL on the quantity of affordable housing delivered
This project, conducted jointly with the University of Sheffield, estimated the impacts of the changes in Section 106 (S106), with the introduction of the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL, on the quantity of affordable housing delivered for the National Housing Federation.
The role of the planning system in delivering housing choice for older Londoners
This project looked into the housing needs of older people in London for the Greater London Authority. It was commissioned as a ‘think piece’, looking specifically at the role of the planning system in helping to ensure that older Londoners have a genuine choice of homes that they can afford and which meet their requirements for different sizes and types of dwelling in the highest quality environments.
Supporting assumptions used in planning for housing
This project aimed to produce five short notes on the main drivers of demographic change that would support a basic excel ‘tool’. Local authorities would be able to freely access the tool in order to help understand the impacts on future housing requirements in their area.
Maximising the performance of the new Section 106 and Community Infrastructure Levy Planning Framework with Local Authorities: Developing a planning gain model
Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research developed a simple model to estimate the impact of charging different CIL and S106 rates on the economic viability of development. The model has potential to assist local authorities in modelling the impact of different CIL and S106 rates on the economic viability of development across their area.
Understanding recent changes in household formation rates and their implications for planning for housing
This project will assist those producing local plans to understand what has happened recently and, in the light of that, make an informed judgement about the assumptions they should make for their plan period.

Housing Need and Supply

The housing market and the wider economy
Our collaborative research programme for Places for People will take an in depth look at the housing market and the complexity of its relationship with society and the wider economy.
Wylfa Newydd Housing Study
The Wylfa Newydd Housing Study (Stage 1), commissioned by the Isle of Anglesey County Council and undertaken by CCHPR, reviewed Horizon Nuclear Power’s Construction Worker Accommodation Strategy. It identified the key issues and impacts of the proposed development, and outlined the measures required to alleviate impacts, on the local housing market. The purpose of the second stage of the study is to further define and justify the mitigation measures required, and to provide the required evidence, to underpin the ‘Housing Fund’ in the s106 Agreement in order to ensure that the Isle of Anglesey County Council has a robust and credible evidence base leading into the Development Consent Order (DCO) investigation.
The Edge Debate: OxMKCam growth corridor symposium
Gemma Burgess gave a presentation at Edge Debate 87: The Oxford – Milton Keynes – Cambridge Growth Corridor. The debate looked at the potential to plan for sustainable growth, making places that work for people.
Purpose built student accommodation
CCHPR have conducted research into identified demand for undergraduate and postgraduate student accommodation on behalf of Vita Group.
The Prevalence of Rough Sleeping and Sofa Surfing Amongst Young People in the UK
Assessment of Student Housing Demand and Supply for Cambridge City Council and Oxford City Council
Cambridge City Council and Oxford City Council commissioned this study to inform planning policy with regard to the provision of student accommodation, and its impact upon housing need, within the two cities.
The impacts of family support on access to homeownership for young people in the UK
The Social Mobility Commission (SMC) commissioned CCHPR to undertake research that focused on the relationship between parental background and young people’s access to homeownership. This research formed part of SMC’s role as an advocate for social mobility in the UK, and informed the 2016 State of the Nation report to Parliament.
New housing, business space and infrastructure in London
This research was conducted in partnership with University College London (UCL).
Housing Need and Supply
Using household income data at micro-level to aid social housing providers’ decisions on affordable rents levels, ‘pay-to-stay’ and other market-based policies
This project aimed to increase the usage of our recent research to develop an optimal method to estimate household income distributions at the very local level.
Multi generational living: potential opportunities for the house building sector?
This research for the NHBC Foundation analysed the scale and nature of multi generational living in England and explored the opportunities that this presents to the house building sector.
Downsizing and moving in later life - new build housing or existing stock?
This research explored why older households move in later life, the size of property they moved to and why they choose either new build housing or existing stock. It considered what the house building sector can learn from their experience and what opportunities that this presents to the house building sector.
Estimated net income distribution of working households by household type and locality
This project estimated working households’ net income distributions at local authority level. 'Net income' was defined as income excluding income-related benefits – most notably, Housing Benefit.
Identifying housing need in the horseracing industry
In order to inform its investment plans and future housing strategy Racing Homes wanted to ascertain the level of housing need currently experienced within the horse racing industry and, in particular, where they have existing housing stock. The aim of this research was to establish the degree and nature of current unmet need for affordable housing among racing staff and to make recommendations as to how that need may best be met.
Validation of an objectively assessed housing need for West Oxfordshire Council
West Oxfordshire Council commissioned CCHPR to validate projections of housing need in the selected local authority areas up to 2031, which was set out the Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA).
Baseline Study for Intermediate Housing Market in and around Cambridge City
This was a short term research project into the size of the intermediate housing market in the City of Cambridge and its immediate surroundings, and the likely demand for intermediate forms of tenure, both for rent and for partial ownership.
Estimated net income distribution for eight household types in the London Borough of Bromley at mid-Super Output Area (SOA) level
Information about household incomes at a local level is difficult to obtain yet social landlords may need such data in order to set rents. To address this issue, CCHPR has developed a model to estimate household income distribution by percentile for eight household types at local market level.
Increasing housing supply: Research to support Lloyds Banking Group’s Housing Commission
This project provided evidence to support the Housing Commission in exploring what works to increase housing supply. It looked at a range of policy measures such as New Towns, bringing empty homes back into use, self build and custom build, the role of taxation in promoting housing supply and affordability, different models of delivering affordable housing and ways of increasing overall housing production. It started with a policy and practice overview and produced an Interim Report in time to encourage discussion and debate at the party political conferences. It included consideration of regional and devolved government and concluded with recommendations.
Housing need and effective demand in England
The purpose of this note was to review current concepts and measures of housing need in use in England, and how they relate to effective demand. It looks at what is likely to be the new supply of housing that would be required to meet the need generated by population and household growth and change; how much of this supply could be generated by private effective demand; and how much would depend on assistance.
Housing need and demand in Wales
The objective of this project was to use new data to revise and update the modelling of need and demand undertaken by CCHPR for the Welsh Government in 2010. The key research question was 'What is the housing ‘need’ in Wales and how is it expected to evolve in the coming years?'
Looking into the future: How many homes do we need and what happens if we do not build them?
How many homes we need over the next 20 years is a highly contentious political issue and a major headache for local authorities who are required by the new planning system to decide their area’s “objectively assessed needs”. Presented by CCHPR Visiting Fellow Neil McDonald.
Review of “Young people and housing: transitions, trajectories and generational fractures”
Mike Oxley provided a review of “Young people and housing: transitions, trajectories and generational fractures”, edited by Ray Forrest and Ngai ming Yip, for the International Journal of Housing Policy.
Local public finance and housing policy conference. Presentation by Dr Gemma Burgess - Case Study UK: rising house prices and under supply
Dr Gemma Burgess gave a key note speech at the local public finance and housing policy conference in Israel in December 2014, hosted by the Gazit-Globe Real Estate Institute at IDC Herzliya. The presentation - Case Study UK: rising house prices and under supply – focuses on housing supply constraints.
Housing Supply– challenges for policy makers. Presentation by Dr Gemma Burgess to the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Social Science and Policy, 21 October 2014, House of Commons
Dr Gemma Burgess gave a presentation to the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Social Science and Policy, 21 October 2014, at the House of Commons as part of the session on Housing Supply– challenges for policy makers. The presentation focuses on the constraints on new housing supply.
Understanding recent changes in household formation rates and their implications for planning for housing
This project will assist those producing local plans to understand what has happened recently and, in the light of that, make an informed judgement about the assumptions they should make for their plan period.
Mechanisms to increase housing supply in England
The Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research recently completed an international review of land supply and planning systems, published by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation March 2013. The review identified measures taken successfully in other countries to bring land forward for housing. However, it showed that in England many of these mechanisms are already available or in place in some form. The key issue is therefore why are they not used more widely or more effectively? This new research, funded by the RICS, builds on this review to identify the relevant comparable instruments in England and what the barriers and constraints are on using these mechanisms more successfully.
An economic and spatial analysis of the future development of Wisbech in Cambridgeshire
This work aimed to assess: (1) The current economic profile of Wisbech; (2) The likely future economic role of Wisbech under different scenarios; (3) The sectors most likely to have potential for future employment growth; and to make (4) Make broad recommendations for future economic and spatial strategies to 2020.
The implications of the 2008-based household projections for estimates of housing need
Alan Holmans’ new article was published in the September 2012 issue of the TCPA journal.
Household Projections in England: their history and uses
Alan Holmans has produced a new report on the Household Projections in England: Their History and Uses. Household projections are an important tool for estimating future housing demand and need and the land supply required if all households are to be adequately housed.
Housing markets in the Channel Islands
This overview of housing markets and their economic context in the Channel Islands, based upon secondary data, was commissioned by One Savings Bank.

Affordability

The Shared Ownership Sector in 2020
The aim of this research is to provide an analysis of the shared ownership sector in 2020, with a focus on the supply and management side of the industry, rather than the demand side.
The housing market and the wider economy
Our collaborative research programme for Places for People will take an in depth look at the housing market and the complexity of its relationship with society and the wider economy.
Digital Nomads
The aim of this research, funded by the Centre for Digital Built Britain, was to understand how digital technology is being used to enable new forms of shared living in the private rented sector. With a focus on the use of digital technology in shared rented accommodation, the research investigated the application of digital technology in three areas: access to properties, management of properties and lived experience.
Developing income-linked rents for CHS Group
Joseph Rowntree Foundation and CHS Group have commissioned CCHPR to explore how CHS Group can set rents that are genuinely affordable for its clients. This research will inform CHS’s policy on rent setting beyond 2020 and, at this opportune time, provide an opportunity to influence sector thinking and relevant government policy.
Evaluation of the Reimagining Rent Programme
The Young Foundation commissioned CCHPR to undertake an evaluation of the Reimagining Rent Programme, assessing its effectiveness in supporting participating innovations to grow and achieving wider impact.
Using incentives to improve the private rented sector for people in poverty
The Joseph Rowntree Foundation commissioned CCHPR to investigate how to improve the English private rented sector as a source of accommodation for people in poverty. The project explored whether taxation could be used to incentivise private landlords to improve the affordability, conditions or security of rented housing.
London Strategic Housing Initiative Evaluation
Trust for London and Citizens UK have commissioned CCHPR to undertake the evaluation of an initiative aimed at improving housing in London for citizens on low incomes.
The Prevalence of Rough Sleeping and Sofa Surfing Amongst Young People in the UK
Shared Ownership: Ugly sister or Cinderella?
Shared ownership has been in operation for over 35 years and forms an established part of the UK housing landscape. It makes up a substantial and increasing proportion of new-build Affordable Housing, and is now set to be further expanded.
Consultancy input into Evaluation of the JRF’s Housing and Poverty Programme
Anna Clarke worked with Cambridge Policy Consultants as an advisor on their evaluation of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation’s Housing and Poverty Programme.
Poverty, evictions and forced moves
This project was awarded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and supported by Shelter, in order to understand the causes of landlord evictions and of forced moves, where tenants feel compelled to move home for reasons such as affordability, security or to move away from particular locations. The final report was published in July 2017.
Understanding the likely poverty impacts of the extension of Right to Buy to housing association tenants
This short piece of research, commissioned by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation aimed to better understand likely poverty impacts of the extension of Right to Buy to housing associations and the associated sale of higher value local authority stock.
Identifying housing need in the horseracing industry
In order to inform its investment plans and future housing strategy Racing Homes wanted to ascertain the level of housing need currently experienced within the horse racing industry and, in particular, where they have existing housing stock. The aim of this research was to establish the degree and nature of current unmet need for affordable housing among racing staff and to make recommendations as to how that need may best be met.
The role of housing and housing providers in tackling poverty experienced by young people in the UK
CCHPR was awarded funding for this work from the ESRC as part of their What Works in Tackling Poverty programme. The ESRC funded four new research projects that aimed to advance understanding of effective strategies for tackling poverty. This project explored the role of housing and housing providers in tackling poverty experienced by young people in the UK.
Promoting policy change to boost the supply of affordable housing
The project sought to influence (a) public policy on affordable housing supply policy instruments and (b) public understanding of policy measures that would increase the supply of affordable housing through the production of a short film, a policy workshop, and engagement with politicians and the general public.
Estimating the scale of youth homelessness in the UK
Centrepoint, the youth homeless charity, commissioned CCHPR to calculate up to date estimates of the number of young people experiencing homelessness in the UK during a year.
Benefit Cap: In-depth interviews with affected claimants
The DWP commissioned CCHPR to undertake a series of qualitative interviews with households affected by the Benefit Cap.
Review of “Young people and housing: transitions, trajectories and generational fractures”
Mike Oxley provided a review of “Young people and housing: transitions, trajectories and generational fractures”, edited by Ray Forrest and Ngai ming Yip, for the International Journal of Housing Policy.
Poverty focused review of housing organisations’ strategic and business plans
The Joseph Rowntree foundation commissioned CCHPR to carry out a poverty-focussed review of housing organisations’ strategic and business plans. With input from Savills, this project explored where poverty fits within the strategies, policies and business plans of local authorities, housing associations and private landlords. It involved detailed analysis of business plans, housing and organisational strategies, annual reports, tenancy strategies, allocations and lettings policies and other relevant strategies.
The role of the private rented sector in preventing homelessness: identifying good practice and the impact of policy change
The Oak Foundation commissioned research into private rented sector access schemes that focuses on good practice as demonstrated through Oak funded projects. The research also looked more broadly at other successful practices and models. The intention was to share good practice from Oak funded schemes and others; to provide practical advice to existing schemes in order to respond to recent welfare policy changes; and demonstrate the potential for private renting schemes to meet specific housing needs.
Mapping the number of extra housing units needed for young people
Centrepoint, the youth homeless charity, commissioned CCHPR to carry out some work looking at the requirement for emergency homeless accommodation, supporting housing units, social housing and private rented housing with the use of Housing Benefit across England with a specific focus on the requirements for those aged 16-25.
North West Cambridge rent policy
This paper analysed University staff incomes and made recommendations for rent policy in north west Cambridge.
Housing in young adulthood
Prof Mike Oxley's presentation at a policy workshop hosted by the University of Cambridge in London summarised the findings of ESRC-funded research into the housing issues faced by some young adults.
Michael Oxley: Urban Renewal Policy conference, NRU Moscow
Prof Michael Oxley opened a conference held by the Graduate School of Urbanism, part of the NRU Higher School of Ecoonomics, Moscow in October 2018.
Deprivation and community need in Suffolk
This project sought to assemble a coherent evidence place on where deprivation is experienced in Suffolk, how it is concentrated and where it may be hard to identify. It built on an assumption that deprivation can be material, physical or social and may be obscured by being concentrated in certain places or among certain groups of population. It may also arise from a combination of personal and place characteristics.
Analysis of available data on affordable housing investment
Using existing data sources, the purpose of this project was to provide a strong evidence base to show what the current provision of affordable housing built over the preceding 20 years looked like in terms of location, type of housing and size, and whether it is significantly different compared with past provision. The aim was to demonstrate what has been achieved in terms of investment in affordable housing, and to link this with tenant satisfaction.
Forty years of working with the homeless in Cambridge: Cambridge Cyrenians 1970-2010
A book on the 40 year history of Cambridge Cyrenians was published in 2010. The book traces the history of the Cyrenians’ work with the homeless in Cambridge from their origins in the late 1960s to the current day.
The Ward Penalty in Birmingham
The Barrow Cadbury Trust approached Land Economy and CCHPR to conduct an investigation into the relationships between race, place and poverty in Birmingham. The study arose from the observation that many of the highly deprived parts of the city, particularly the inner urban areas, are also those with large minority ethnic populations.
Low Cost Home Ownership and the credit crunch: Regional markets and competition with private developers
The aim of this study was to expand upon research conducted for the Housing Corporation, Low Cost Home Ownership: Affordability, Risks and Issues, in early 2008.

The Digital Agenda

Flourishing Systems
The Cambridge Centre for Digital Built Britain have published a white paper: 'Flourishing systems: re-envisioning infrastructure as a platform for human flourishing'.
Construction Innovation Hub
Dr Gemma Burgess, Acting Director of CCHPR, is a Co-Investigator on the £72m Construction Innovation Hub, a partnership between the Centre for Digital Built Britain (CDBB), the Building Research Establishment (BRE), and the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC).
Uptake of digital tools in the UK house building sector
Our mini-project for the Centre for Digital Built Britain looked at the uptake of digital tools in the UK house building sector. It provides a ‘state of the nation’ report into the opportunities and barriers to the uptake of the digital tools, standards and processes that are collectively known as Building Information Modelling (BIM).
Digital Built Britain Housing Network
The Centre for Digital Built Britain (CDBB) commissioned CCHPR to establish a network of academics, practitioners, policy makers and government to determine the key areas of inquiry in relation to residential housing and DBB. An evidence base was established in order to scope out a research programme designed to meet the needs of UK plc in delivering housing in a digital built Britain.

Modern Methods of Construction & Offsite Manufacturing

Understanding the socio-economic inhibitors to the take up of digital innovation in construction
Transforming construction is a social, cultural, economic and political challenge, and not just a technical problem, and our project will focus on the key social and cultural factors inhibiting digital uptake in the construction sector and which are holding back transformation across the construction supply chain. The research will seek to understand and then improve the socio-cultural bottlenecks preventing the uptake of technical innovations in construction.
Construction Innovation Hub
Dr Gemma Burgess, Acting Director of CCHPR, is a Co-Investigator on the £72m Construction Innovation Hub, a partnership between the Centre for Digital Built Britain (CDBB), the Building Research Establishment (BRE), and the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC).
Digital Nomads
The aim of this research, funded by the Centre for Digital Built Britain, was to understand how digital technology is being used to enable new forms of shared living in the private rented sector. With a focus on the use of digital technology in shared rented accommodation, the research investigated the application of digital technology in three areas: access to properties, management of properties and lived experience.
Uptake of digital tools in the UK house building sector
Our mini-project for the Centre for Digital Built Britain looked at the uptake of digital tools in the UK house building sector. It provides a ‘state of the nation’ report into the opportunities and barriers to the uptake of the digital tools, standards and processes that are collectively known as Building Information Modelling (BIM).
Digital Built Britain Housing Network
The Centre for Digital Built Britain (CDBB) commissioned CCHPR to establish a network of academics, practitioners, policy makers and government to determine the key areas of inquiry in relation to residential housing and DBB. An evidence base was established in order to scope out a research programme designed to meet the needs of UK plc in delivering housing in a digital built Britain.
Is co-living a housing solution for vulnerable older people?
Many vulnerable older people face related challenges around poor housing, poverty, loneliness and lack of support, which co-living housing models have the potential to address. The Nationwide Foundation and the Nationwide Building Society have funded CCHPR to conduct research in order to understand the benefits, risks and potential for scaling up of co-living models for vulnerable older people. Our research includes analysis of the complex and sometimes ambiguous legal and financial frameworks that can apply to such households.

Building Information Modelling

Understanding the socio-economic inhibitors to the take up of digital innovation in construction
Transforming construction is a social, cultural, economic and political challenge, and not just a technical problem, and our project will focus on the key social and cultural factors inhibiting digital uptake in the construction sector and which are holding back transformation across the construction supply chain. The research will seek to understand and then improve the socio-cultural bottlenecks preventing the uptake of technical innovations in construction.
Construction Innovation Hub
Dr Gemma Burgess, Acting Director of CCHPR, is a Co-Investigator on the £72m Construction Innovation Hub, a partnership between the Centre for Digital Built Britain (CDBB), the Building Research Establishment (BRE), and the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC).
Digital Nomads
The aim of this research, funded by the Centre for Digital Built Britain, was to understand how digital technology is being used to enable new forms of shared living in the private rented sector. With a focus on the use of digital technology in shared rented accommodation, the research investigated the application of digital technology in three areas: access to properties, management of properties and lived experience.
Uptake of digital tools in the UK house building sector
Our mini-project for the Centre for Digital Built Britain looked at the uptake of digital tools in the UK house building sector. It provides a ‘state of the nation’ report into the opportunities and barriers to the uptake of the digital tools, standards and processes that are collectively known as Building Information Modelling (BIM).
Digital Built Britain Housing Network
The Centre for Digital Built Britain (CDBB) commissioned CCHPR to establish a network of academics, practitioners, policy makers and government to determine the key areas of inquiry in relation to residential housing and DBB. An evidence base was established in order to scope out a research programme designed to meet the needs of UK plc in delivering housing in a digital built Britain.
Is co-living a housing solution for vulnerable older people?
Many vulnerable older people face related challenges around poor housing, poverty, loneliness and lack of support, which co-living housing models have the potential to address. The Nationwide Foundation and the Nationwide Building Society have funded CCHPR to conduct research in order to understand the benefits, risks and potential for scaling up of co-living models for vulnerable older people. Our research includes analysis of the complex and sometimes ambiguous legal and financial frameworks that can apply to such households.

Social Housing

The Shared Ownership Sector in 2020
The aim of this research is to provide an analysis of the shared ownership sector in 2020, with a focus on the supply and management side of the industry, rather than the demand side.
The Case for Social Housing
Mike Oxley, Director of CCHPR, delivered a keynote lecture on The Case for Social Housing at UWA Perth's Social Impact Festival on 19 July 2017.
Shared housing for non-resident parents
Commonweal Housing has funded the Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research to research the housing needs and views of non-resident parents who live, or have considered living, in shared housing.
Government Policy and the Profile of Housing Provision in England
CCHPR were commissioned by Places for People to explore the impact on government policy on the profile of housing provision in England. It will consider the impact of the Housing and Planning Bill and other reforms to welfare, housing and planning policy on the social and affordable housing sector in England.
Feasibility study of the prospect of developing a viable housing model for those entitled only to access the shared accommodation rate
Community Housing Cymru and the Welsh Local Government Association have commissioned CCHPR to undertake a study into viable housing models for single people only entitled to the housing benefit shared accommodation rate.
Using household income data at micro-level to aid social housing providers’ decisions on affordable rents levels, ‘pay-to-stay’ and other market-based policies
This project aimed to increase the usage of our recent research to develop an optimal method to estimate household income distributions at the very local level.
Understanding the likely poverty impacts of the extension of Right to Buy to housing association tenants
This short piece of research, commissioned by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation aimed to better understand likely poverty impacts of the extension of Right to Buy to housing associations and the associated sale of higher value local authority stock.
Estimated net income distribution of working households by household type and locality
This project estimated working households’ net income distributions at local authority level. 'Net income' was defined as income excluding income-related benefits – most notably, Housing Benefit.
Prospects for investment in social housing
The project investigated whether institutional investors could be attracted to expand the social housing sector in the UK. It also examined how the needs of institutional investors and social housing providers can be better aligned by drawing on experience in other countries.
Housing costs, affordability and rent setting
Affinity Sutton commissioned this work from CCHPR to update and build on the definitions of affordability discussed in previous work on market-pegged social rents and local income distributions to determine rent levels that may be deemed affordable according to local incomes and/or earnings, taking account of the impact of geography, household size/composition and the current changes in welfare benefits.
Poverty focused review of housing organisations’ strategic and business plans
The Joseph Rowntree foundation commissioned CCHPR to carry out a poverty-focussed review of housing organisations’ strategic and business plans. With input from Savills, this project explored where poverty fits within the strategies, policies and business plans of local authorities, housing associations and private landlords. It involved detailed analysis of business plans, housing and organisational strategies, annual reports, tenancy strategies, allocations and lettings policies and other relevant strategies.
Review of Affordable Housing Gateway in Jersey
The States of Jersey commissioned CCHPR to undertake a full and independent review to ensure that the then new Affordable Housing Gateway, launched in January 2012, was supported appropriately in respect of policy, process and procedures; that it was appropriately resourced (both staff and IT) and that itw as as efficient as it could be and was fit for purpose. The work used a ‘lean methodology’ that combined data analysis with interviews with staff and clients and comparison with best practice in the UK.
Evaluation of the Removal of the Spare Room Subsidy and household Benefit Cap
This evaluation sought to understand the impact of the size criteria on claimants, landlords and other stakeholders and to explore how households responded to the reduction in their benefits.
Update of UK Housing Finance entry
The Housing Finance Information Network (HOFINET) is a quality-assured web portal that consolidates regularly updated international housing finance knowledge in one central, easily accessible place (http://www.hofinet.org/). CCHPR supplied the UK entry.
Changing the profile of social housing: The impact of prioritising working applicants on letting patterns - Working Note
Analysis by CCHPR models the likely impact of allocating a larger proportion of social housing to working households.
Support in the preparation of a housing strategy for Jersey
The States of Jersey commissioned CCHPR to provide support to its embryonic Strategic Housing unit in the preparation of an island wide, cross tenure Housing Strategy. The project comprises a series of papers for discussion with officers and the relevant Ministers between November 2012 and April 2013, leading to the production of a public Consulation Paper for circulation in May and a final Strategy Paper for debate in the States Assembly in June/July 2013. It identified the main issues and options in order to built a shared understanding of the issues, the range of policy options available and the financial implications. The aim of the project was to develop a broad consensus on the appropriate housing strategy for Jersey.
Research into the future of the social rented sector
This project was commissioned by East 7, a group of housing associations in the East of England, to inform their own strategy and policy development and to assist East 7 members in engaging in the policy debate with ministers and other opinion formers.
Freedom to succeed: liberating the potential of housing associations
In 2011 and 2012, CCHPR worked with the Housing Futures Network to explore future directions for housing associations. We are now able to circulate the summary and final reports from that work.
Fundamental review of housing allocations policy in Northern Ireland
The Housing Division of the Department for Social Development (DSD) commissioned a research project designed to make a significant contribution to a fundamental review of social housing allocations in Northern Ireland. The purpose of the review was to ensure that the processes of applying for and letting social housing make the most effective use of scarce public resources in identifying and meeting housing need, within the context of broader government priorities.
NewBuy; a review of mortgage pricing
The NewBuy project was a short piece of research based advice for officials in the Department of Communities and Local Government, not intended for publication.
Making best use of a scarce asset: Can we use social housing more efficiently?
This project ran throughout 2012 and involved a series of six half-day workshops, attended by social landlords throughout the UK in order to share research evidence and help them to develop their policies and practice in making best use of their housing stock.
Future investment in affordable housing
The National Housing Federation, in partnership with CCHPR, explored possible models for investment in new affordable homes. This research contributes to that work.
Facing the future: The future role and financing of social housing
The Housing Futures Network commissioned CCHPR to produce new work looking at the future of the social housing sector. The work looked at the future options for financing the sector, and the implications of the latest policy reforms, including welfare reform, housing benefits and under-occupation.
Opportunities for institutional investment in affordable housing
This report prepared by Peter Williams (CCHPR), Nick Salisbury (Barclays Corporate Real Estate) and Robin Caven (HCA) on behalf of the HCA’s Housing Finance Group offers an assessment of the potential for institutional investment in affordable housing and puts forward suggestions as to how this market might be developed.
Affordable Rents assessment for Cambridge City
This research was undertaken in order to provide an assessment of affordability of housing association and local authority rents when pegged at given ratios of prevailing market rents within Cambridge City and the housing sub-market.
Market-pegged rents in the social sector
This project examined the affordability of rents set as percentages of open-market prices, as proposed in the HCA's Affordable Rents Framework. The project reviewed the literature on affordability, and looked at data on recent trends in new lettings in the social sector.
Michael Oxley: Urban Renewal Policy conference, NRU Moscow
Prof Michael Oxley opened a conference held by the Graduate School of Urbanism, part of the NRU Higher School of Ecoonomics, Moscow in October 2018.
Housing association service charges for general needs housing
This project examined how service charges applied to general needs stock by housing associations varied between different property types and sizes, and between types of association.
Comparison of stock, rents and service charges among different types of social landlords
This project draws comparisons of stock, rents and service charges between four different types of social landlord; Traditional mixed funded Registered Social Landlords (RSLs); RSLs who have taken over local authority stock via Large Scale Voluntary Transfer; Local authorities (retention LAs); and Arms Length Management Organisations (ALMOs).
Local authority CORE data imputation and weighting methodology study
This research, commissioned by Communities and Local Government, considered how to adjust for missing local authority data within the Continuous Recording of Lettings (LA CORE) system.

Private Rented Sector

Digital Nomads
The aim of this research, funded by the Centre for Digital Built Britain, was to understand how digital technology is being used to enable new forms of shared living in the private rented sector. With a focus on the use of digital technology in shared rented accommodation, the research investigated the application of digital technology in three areas: access to properties, management of properties and lived experience.
Parenting in a house share (ESRC IAA)
Contract research for Commonweal Housing explored different types of shared housing available for non-resident parents and investigated their experiences of parenting their children whilst living in shared housing. This ESRC Impact Acceleration Account project will significantly increase the wider impact of this research, and will focus on the experience of fathers.
Evaluation of the Reimagining Rent Programme
The Young Foundation commissioned CCHPR to undertake an evaluation of the Reimagining Rent Programme, assessing its effectiveness in supporting participating innovations to grow and achieving wider impact.
Research into Letting Agents Fees to Tenants in Wales
The Welsh Government funded CCHPR's research into fees charged to tenants in the private rented sector across Wales
Modelling the impact of taxation reform on the PRS
Significant policy changes affecting the private rented sector have the potential for a serious impact on the centre as the majority of landlords face increased taxation. The Residential Landlords Association commissioned research to develop an economic model of the finances of PRS landlords and property investors in order to identify the wider impact of the recent taxation reforms.
A better quality PRS: the role of SME investment
This project, commissioned by Lloyds Banking Group, explored the role of SME investment in the private rented sector. It aimed to raise the profile of this part of the PRS, adding to the understanding of its impact and to inform policy discussion.
Poverty, evictions and forced moves
This project was awarded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and supported by Shelter, in order to understand the causes of landlord evictions and of forced moves, where tenants feel compelled to move home for reasons such as affordability, security or to move away from particular locations. The final report was published in July 2017.
How do landlords address poverty? A poverty-focused review of the stratetgies of local authorities, landlords and letting agents in England
Rising rents, more low‑income households in private renting, reduced funding for house building and welfare reforms present major challenges for landlords and local authorities in England. This research explores how landlords are responding, what can be learnt from their written strategies and plans, and what happens in practice.
The effects of rent controls on supply and markets
This project, commissioned by Shelter, explored the possible effects of different rent control scenarios on the operation of the Private Rented Sector in England. Six different rent control options were considered, proposing different limits to rents and changes to security of tenure.
The private rented sector in North Hertfordshire
This project involved analysis of private sector data to assist North Hertfordshire District Council in developing its private sector housing strategy.
Tax credits for affordable housing in the USA: could they work elsewhere?
This article by Mike Oxley, published by Housing Finance International in Spring 2015, examines the operation of Low Income Housing Tax Credits in the USA.
The role of policy in influencing differences between countries in the size of the private rented housing sector
In a presentation at the Department of Land Economy, Professor Mike Oxley addressed the following topics: Comparative studies of rented housing; What is private rented housing?; How much of it is there?; Why is there more in some countries than others?; Does policy explain international differences in the proportion of private rented housing?
Understanding private landlord financial and regulatory incentives for property investment
The private rented sector is growing rapidly yet has the worst physical property conditions of all tenures. More than nine million households rent privately yet more than a third of private rented homes fail to meet the Decent Homes Standard. Private renting is now the only option for a growing number of households who cannot afford home ownership yet will not realistically qualify for social housing. Shelter has commissioned CCHPR to investigate the financial provisions landlords put in place to maintain the condition of their property. The research is part of a wider programme of work to understand the dynamics of safety and housing conditions in the sector. The research aim is to understand the incentives and barriers to investment in upgrading the quality of private rented housing.
Understanding the role of private renting: a four country case study
The objective of this project, funded by Realdania, was to better understand the incentives and constraints around private rental provision across different institutional, economic and policy frameworks. The research also sought to clarify the factors that might help generate investment in private renting and an efficient and flexible sector which could meet household requirements.
The role of the private rented sector in preventing homelessness: identifying good practice and the impact of policy change
The Oak Foundation commissioned research into private rented sector access schemes that focuses on good practice as demonstrated through Oak funded projects. The research also looked more broadly at other successful practices and models. The intention was to share good practice from Oak funded schemes and others; to provide practical advice to existing schemes in order to respond to recent welfare policy changes; and demonstrate the potential for private renting schemes to meet specific housing needs.
Analysis of the private rented sector in Richmond upon Thames and surrounding areas
Richmond Council, together with Richmond Housing Partnership, jointly commissioned research in order to form the evidence base of their tenancy strategy. This work helped supplement this evidence base by improving understanding of the private rented sector in and nearby to Richmond with a particular focus on the availability of housing for low income groups. The research made use of data on advertised rents in the private rented sector and also drew on interviews with local letting agencies.
The contribution and potential of the private residential rental market in New Zealand
Providing country profiles for England, France and Germany in relation to a template provided by Darroch Ltd, the contractor.
Private housing sector: The UK and ideas from other countries
The private rented housing sector: The UK and ideas from other countries - a seminar presentation to the Social Market Foundation by Michael Oxley, March 2017
The private rented sector in the new century: A comparative approach
The objective of this research was to examine the extent to which different regulatory frameworks across Europe have generated different incentives to provide private rental housing, to live in private rental housing, and to fund that housing.
Housing benefit changes and their effects on the private rented sector
The project looked at the short and longer term influences on the supply of private rented housing to poorer households in Britain. The Government’s emergency budget of June 2010 proposed substantial reductions in the Local Housing Allowance (LHA) payments made to private tenants who cannot afford their rent.
Private Rented Sector Services Review
Hammersmith and Fulham commissioned Organisational Development to carry out a review of their Private Rented Sector. Anna Clarke's input in a consultancy role on this work offered advice re the use of the private rented sector within Housing Options.
Economic and housing market downturn and potential impact on renters and rented sectors
This is an ‘expert panel’ study for CLG looking at the impact of the economic and housing market downturn on the rented sector of the housing market.
Comparative analysis of private and social sectors’ rates of return 2007-2009
These papers compare the findings on RSL sector and the private rented sector to provide a clear picture of the extent to which rent and rate of return differentials vary by area, type, etc.
Estimating rates of return on private sector rents: 1996/97 to 2005/06
This paper analyses the relationship between private sector rents and house prices in order to examine the viability of the sector in that rents are the only form of return available to the private sector landlord.
Estimating rates of return on private sector rents
The original reason for this research was to assess the extent to which it would be appropriate to use lower quartile house prices as a surrogate for private rents in regional and local analysis in the light of the difficulties in obtaining Rent Officer Service data on the rents they determine for Housing Benefit purposes.
Private rented sector and buy to let mortgage market: five year outlook
OneSavings Bank plc (OSB) commissioned research from CCHPR into the private rented sector and buy to let market. This will helped develop a deeper understanding of the drivers of the market.
Landlord portfolio management - past and future
This research explored how landlords manage their portfolios and make decisions over buying and selling stock. It was commissioned by Shelter in order to explore how landlords manage their businesses, how this might affect tenants and how this might change in the future.

Alternative Models of Housing

Gated communities and land administration challenges in Ghana: reappraising the reasons why people move into gated communities
This paper, by Richmond Ehwi, Prof Nicky Morrison and Prof Pete Tyler, was published online in Housing Studies in December 2019.
Residential trajectories of high-skilled transnational migrants in a global city: Exploring the housing choices of Russian and Italian professionals in London
A paper by Dr Sabina Maslova and Prof Russell King has been published in Cities.
The housing market and the wider economy
Our collaborative research programme for Places for People will take an in depth look at the housing market and the complexity of its relationship with society and the wider economy.
Digital Nomads
The aim of this research, funded by the Centre for Digital Built Britain, was to understand how digital technology is being used to enable new forms of shared living in the private rented sector. With a focus on the use of digital technology in shared rented accommodation, the research investigated the application of digital technology in three areas: access to properties, management of properties and lived experience.
Parenting in a house share (ESRC IAA)
Contract research for Commonweal Housing explored different types of shared housing available for non-resident parents and investigated their experiences of parenting their children whilst living in shared housing. This ESRC Impact Acceleration Account project will significantly increase the wider impact of this research, and will focus on the experience of fathers.
Is co-living a housing solution for vulnerable older people?
Many vulnerable older people face related challenges around poor housing, poverty, loneliness and lack of support, which co-living housing models have the potential to address. The Nationwide Foundation and the Nationwide Building Society have funded CCHPR to conduct research in order to understand the benefits, risks and potential for scaling up of co-living models for vulnerable older people. Our research includes analysis of the complex and sometimes ambiguous legal and financial frameworks that can apply to such households.
Shared Ownership Plus: a review of progress and potential
Thames Valley commissioned a review of their Shared Ownership Plus scheme, a shared ownership scheme which offers greater flexibility in terms of staircasing (buying further shares) for shared owners.
Shared Ownership: Ugly sister or Cinderella?
Shared ownership has been in operation for over 35 years and forms an established part of the UK housing landscape. It makes up a substantial and increasing proportion of new-build Affordable Housing, and is now set to be further expanded.
Multi generational living: potential opportunities for the house building sector?
This research for the NHBC Foundation analysed the scale and nature of multi generational living in England and explored the opportunities that this presents to the house building sector.
Identifying housing need in the horseracing industry
In order to inform its investment plans and future housing strategy Racing Homes wanted to ascertain the level of housing need currently experienced within the horse racing industry and, in particular, where they have existing housing stock. The aim of this research was to establish the degree and nature of current unmet need for affordable housing among racing staff and to make recommendations as to how that need may best be met.
Regional and sub-regional analyses: Residential mobility of social tenants and those entering Low Cost Home Ownershipin the north of England
This study concentrates on four aspects of household mobility in the northern regions:The results reflect a generally immobile sector across all regions in the north with very little systematic pattern in terms of the mobility that does occur.
University of Cambridge staff housing requirements
The University was preparing its long term plans for the development of land in the north west of the city. Part of the proposals included new housing development, and this study was commissioned in late 2004 to find out about staff housing needs and past behaviour. The survey was web-based with the aim of repeating it in the future, perhaps on an annual basis.
Key worker housing in Surrey
These two short projects looked at the crisis in the recruitment and retention of key workers in these highly pressured housing markets on the edge of London.
Need for intermediate housing in the South East
This research developed a methodology for estimating the future need for intermediate market housing – housing that is affordable to those who cannot access market housing but who could afford to pay more than social housing rents. Not all households in the relevant income bracket would want intermediate housing, so estimating the need using secondary data was challenging.
Provision for key workers and unmet housing need
This is a follow up to a previous study which produced an estimate of newly arising demand and need for housing in the East of England. The current study produces an estimate of unmet need and of key worker housing requirements in the region. Part B of the project provides a template for districts and sub-regions to produce their own assessments of key worker housing. Both reports are available on the Assembly’ web site.
SHIP / Spending Review 2004
Shelter commissioned an update of their major Housing Investment Project originally completed and published in 2000. The findings were used to feed into government consultation on the 2004 Comprehensive Spending Review. The report was published by Shelter.
Low Cost Home Ownership in different housing markets
The government has identified the need to concentrate investment, both public and private, in the provision of low-cost homeownership (LCHO) as first time buyers find it more and more difficult to access owner-occupation through traditional open market routes. New initiatives are concerned with increasing the role of private finance through equity mortgages as well as providing a range of shared ownership schemes aimed at key workers and pressure areas. This raises important issues for both private finance institution and government: the institutions are taking on new risks about which they know little, while government wishes to target assistance closely on those who cannot achieve owner-occupation in other ways.
Modelling the future take-up of low-cost home ownership products
This was a two stage project. Stage 1 involved modelling tenure choice using a logit model and data from CORE pooled with Survey of English Housing over 6 years; Stage 2 involved entering the coefficients from the logit model onto an Excel spreadsheet in order to enable scenario planning and sensitivity testing. The outputs allowed DCLG to estimate the likely take-up of different low-cost home ownership products.
A review of Low Cost Home Ownership policies in Wales
The Welsh Assembly Government commissioned a review of Low Cost Home Ownership (LCHO) policies in Wales. The aims of the project were: to assess the effectiveness of LCHO schemes in meeting their stated policy objectives; to assess whether LCHO schemes have wider, or unforeseen consequences on local housing markets and problems; and to advise on whether LCHO schemes were meeting their stated objectives, or whether revisions to the schemes were required, within the policy flexibility available to the Welsh Assembly Government.
Cambridge University staff housing survey 2011
This online survey of University and College staff appointed post 2007 was carried out in order to inform housing provision in north west Cambridge.
Understanding the second-hand market for shared ownership properties
Thames Valley Housing Association and the National Housing Federation commissioned CCHPR to carry out research into the secondary market for shared ownership properties. The research examined national data sources on resales and involved a survey of all major shared ownership providers on resales and staircasing behaviour. It also involved more detailed qualitative work with Thames Valley clients.
Reselling shared ownership properties after improvements
This short research project was commissioned by Thames Valley Housing Association in order to examine the practice of reselling shared ownership homes after the owner has undertaken (and paid for) improvements to their home.

Housing in Older Age

The housing market and the wider economy
Our collaborative research programme for Places for People will take an in depth look at the housing market and the complexity of its relationship with society and the wider economy.
How can smart technologies meet the demand of an ageing population?
The increase in the proportion of older people has been described as “one of the most significant social transformations of the twenty-first century” (United Nations, 2015), with huge implications for government health and social care budgets. Our research for the Dunhill Medical Trust, which starts in October 2019, will collect data about 'smart' home technologies in order to understand how these innovations support wellbeing and independent living.
Multi generational living: potential opportunities for the house building sector?
This research for the NHBC Foundation analysed the scale and nature of multi generational living in England and explored the opportunities that this presents to the house building sector.
Downsizing and moving in later life - new build housing or existing stock?
This research explored why older households move in later life, the size of property they moved to and why they choose either new build housing or existing stock. It considered what the house building sector can learn from their experience and what opportunities that this presents to the house building sector.
Evaluation of support services in Kingston Royal Eye Clinic
The Thomas Pocklington Trust undertook a pilot scheme to provide support to people attending the Royal Eye Clinic at Kingston hospital. The main purpose of this evaluation was to enable lessons to be learned from the pilot, to ensure that others can benefit from its experiences.
Managing Money Better: Evaluation
The Managing Money Better (MMB) project has been evaluated in order to analyse the outcomes for vulnerable older people using the service. The project aimed to reach more vulnerable older people, particularly by providing money advice as a key element of housing and care options advice and support.
Analysing the experience of vulnerable groups with hearing loss in Cambridgeshire
The first phase of the research identified several gaps in knowledge about particular groups within the D/deaf community and also identified gaps in services in Cambridgeshire. The second phase of the research therefore concentrated on these three issues: (1) Rural isolation amongst people with hearing loss; (2) Older people in care homes; (3) Advocacy services.
Value for money assessment of Lincolnshire Home Improvement Agency's housing options service
CCHPR was commissioned to undertake a simple value for money assessment of Linconshire's Home Improvement Agency's Housing Options advice service, to use in informing future funding for the service. Funding for the service has been provided by Lincolnshire County Council and FirstStop. CCHPR is conducting the evaluation of the national FirstStop information and advice service for older people.
Early support for sight loss in Essex: Evaluation
The Pocklington Trust commissioned CCHPR to evaluate the Visionary Development Fund’s project: Early Support in Essex. This project aimed to improve referral to services for elderly people with sight loss in Essex.
Evaluation of Stourbridge lighting intervention
The Thomas Pocklington Trust commissioned CCHPR to undertake an evaluation of lighting interventions on quality of life and, specifically, on its impact on reduction of falls amongst recipients based on a case study of a scheme in Stourbridge.
Evaluation of new lighting intervention schemes being undertaken by benevolent trusts
The Pocklington Trust commissioned CCHPR to undertake an evaluation of lighting interventions on quality of life and specifically on its impact on reduction of falls amongst recipients.
Dementia and sight loss: Developing social care practice in different housing settings
This project, funded by the National Institute for Health Research sought to develop best practice in social care and support for people with dementia and sight loss in a range of housing settings. The research was led by York University and CCHPR led the element of the study on the costs of care in different settings.
Housing wealth and wellbeing: understanding who uses housing equity release products and the impact they have on older people’s lives - scoping study
The UK has an ageing population, placing pressure on housing, health and social care services. Most older people own their homes outright and prefer to remain in the same home as they age, which often requires financial investment, e.g. to pay for home adaptations and care. One way to meet these costs is to release equity from the home. This can be done by moving house, but it can also be done without moving by using equity release products. However, this is a practice about which we know very little.
The role of the planning system in delivering housing choice for older Londoners
This project looked into the housing needs of older people in London for the Greater London Authority. It was commissioned as a ‘think piece’, looking specifically at the role of the planning system in helping to ensure that older Londoners have a genuine choice of homes that they can afford and which meet their requirements for different sizes and types of dwelling in the highest quality environments.
Cost benefit analysis of lighting adaptations
This project involved conducting a cost benefit analysis of lighting adaptations for the Thomas Pocklington Trust, a charity providing housing, care and support for people with sight loss in the UK. The output compares the costs of lighting adaptations to estimates of the costs of falls by elderly people resulting from poor lighting.
Evaluation of the FirstStop information and advice initiative
The Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research evaluated the FirstStop service information and advice service for older people for six years between 2009 and 2015.
Housing association rents and service charges for supported housing and housing for older people
Average housing association rents and service charges for the combined categories, supported housing and housing for older people, by local authority area were collected by the Housing Corporation for the first time in 2005. This project looked in detail at these figures.
Supported housing and housing for older people
The evaluation of the changes relating to Sheltered and Supported Housing will take place from September 2005 to the end of January 2006. The first stage will be a quantitative analysis clarifying whether the changes are as expected and therefore whether what has been asked for is what has been reported. This is particularly important in relation to the time series data. In the second stage, any evidence of significant differences will the analysed through interviews with relevant HAs. Depending on the problems encountered there will be a third stage involving a series of interviews with associations where major changes in categorisation have occurred and those who have experienced little change – to assess whether the new definitions reflect real differences; how demands vary between categories of housing; and housing association attitudes to the definitions now they have been operationalized.
Is co-living a housing solution for vulnerable older people?
Many vulnerable older people face related challenges around poor housing, poverty, loneliness and lack of support, which co-living housing models have the potential to address. The Nationwide Foundation and the Nationwide Building Society have funded CCHPR to conduct research in order to understand the benefits, risks and potential for scaling up of co-living models for vulnerable older people. Our research includes analysis of the complex and sometimes ambiguous legal and financial frameworks that can apply to such households.

Moving House in Older Age

The housing market and the wider economy
Our collaborative research programme for Places for People will take an in depth look at the housing market and the complexity of its relationship with society and the wider economy.
How can smart technologies meet the demand of an ageing population?
The increase in the proportion of older people has been described as “one of the most significant social transformations of the twenty-first century” (United Nations, 2015), with huge implications for government health and social care budgets. Our research for the Dunhill Medical Trust, which starts in October 2019, will collect data about 'smart' home technologies in order to understand how these innovations support wellbeing and independent living.
Multi generational living: potential opportunities for the house building sector?
This research for the NHBC Foundation analysed the scale and nature of multi generational living in England and explored the opportunities that this presents to the house building sector.
Downsizing and moving in later life - new build housing or existing stock?
This research explored why older households move in later life, the size of property they moved to and why they choose either new build housing or existing stock. It considered what the house building sector can learn from their experience and what opportunities that this presents to the house building sector.
Evaluation of support services in Kingston Royal Eye Clinic
The Thomas Pocklington Trust undertook a pilot scheme to provide support to people attending the Royal Eye Clinic at Kingston hospital. The main purpose of this evaluation was to enable lessons to be learned from the pilot, to ensure that others can benefit from its experiences.
Managing Money Better: Evaluation
The Managing Money Better (MMB) project has been evaluated in order to analyse the outcomes for vulnerable older people using the service. The project aimed to reach more vulnerable older people, particularly by providing money advice as a key element of housing and care options advice and support.
Analysing the experience of vulnerable groups with hearing loss in Cambridgeshire
The first phase of the research identified several gaps in knowledge about particular groups within the D/deaf community and also identified gaps in services in Cambridgeshire. The second phase of the research therefore concentrated on these three issues: (1) Rural isolation amongst people with hearing loss; (2) Older people in care homes; (3) Advocacy services.
Value for money assessment of Lincolnshire Home Improvement Agency's housing options service
CCHPR was commissioned to undertake a simple value for money assessment of Linconshire's Home Improvement Agency's Housing Options advice service, to use in informing future funding for the service. Funding for the service has been provided by Lincolnshire County Council and FirstStop. CCHPR is conducting the evaluation of the national FirstStop information and advice service for older people.
Early support for sight loss in Essex: Evaluation
The Pocklington Trust commissioned CCHPR to evaluate the Visionary Development Fund’s project: Early Support in Essex. This project aimed to improve referral to services for elderly people with sight loss in Essex.
Evaluation of Stourbridge lighting intervention
The Thomas Pocklington Trust commissioned CCHPR to undertake an evaluation of lighting interventions on quality of life and, specifically, on its impact on reduction of falls amongst recipients based on a case study of a scheme in Stourbridge.
Evaluation of new lighting intervention schemes being undertaken by benevolent trusts
The Pocklington Trust commissioned CCHPR to undertake an evaluation of lighting interventions on quality of life and specifically on its impact on reduction of falls amongst recipients.
Dementia and sight loss: Developing social care practice in different housing settings
This project, funded by the National Institute for Health Research sought to develop best practice in social care and support for people with dementia and sight loss in a range of housing settings. The research was led by York University and CCHPR led the element of the study on the costs of care in different settings.
Housing wealth and wellbeing: understanding who uses housing equity release products and the impact they have on older people’s lives - scoping study
The UK has an ageing population, placing pressure on housing, health and social care services. Most older people own their homes outright and prefer to remain in the same home as they age, which often requires financial investment, e.g. to pay for home adaptations and care. One way to meet these costs is to release equity from the home. This can be done by moving house, but it can also be done without moving by using equity release products. However, this is a practice about which we know very little.
The role of the planning system in delivering housing choice for older Londoners
This project looked into the housing needs of older people in London for the Greater London Authority. It was commissioned as a ‘think piece’, looking specifically at the role of the planning system in helping to ensure that older Londoners have a genuine choice of homes that they can afford and which meet their requirements for different sizes and types of dwelling in the highest quality environments.
Cost benefit analysis of lighting adaptations
This project involved conducting a cost benefit analysis of lighting adaptations for the Thomas Pocklington Trust, a charity providing housing, care and support for people with sight loss in the UK. The output compares the costs of lighting adaptations to estimates of the costs of falls by elderly people resulting from poor lighting.
Evaluation of the FirstStop information and advice initiative
The Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research evaluated the FirstStop service information and advice service for older people for six years between 2009 and 2015.
Housing association rents and service charges for supported housing and housing for older people
Average housing association rents and service charges for the combined categories, supported housing and housing for older people, by local authority area were collected by the Housing Corporation for the first time in 2005. This project looked in detail at these figures.
Supported housing and housing for older people
The evaluation of the changes relating to Sheltered and Supported Housing will take place from September 2005 to the end of January 2006. The first stage will be a quantitative analysis clarifying whether the changes are as expected and therefore whether what has been asked for is what has been reported. This is particularly important in relation to the time series data. In the second stage, any evidence of significant differences will the analysed through interviews with relevant HAs. Depending on the problems encountered there will be a third stage involving a series of interviews with associations where major changes in categorisation have occurred and those who have experienced little change – to assess whether the new definitions reflect real differences; how demands vary between categories of housing; and housing association attitudes to the definitions now they have been operationalized.
Is co-living a housing solution for vulnerable older people?
Many vulnerable older people face related challenges around poor housing, poverty, loneliness and lack of support, which co-living housing models have the potential to address. The Nationwide Foundation and the Nationwide Building Society have funded CCHPR to conduct research in order to understand the benefits, risks and potential for scaling up of co-living models for vulnerable older people. Our research includes analysis of the complex and sometimes ambiguous legal and financial frameworks that can apply to such households.

Smart Homes for Older Age

The housing market and the wider economy
Our collaborative research programme for Places for People will take an in depth look at the housing market and the complexity of its relationship with society and the wider economy.
How can smart technologies meet the demand of an ageing population?
The increase in the proportion of older people has been described as “one of the most significant social transformations of the twenty-first century” (United Nations, 2015), with huge implications for government health and social care budgets. Our research for the Dunhill Medical Trust, which starts in October 2019, will collect data about 'smart' home technologies in order to understand how these innovations support wellbeing and independent living.
Multi generational living: potential opportunities for the house building sector?
This research for the NHBC Foundation analysed the scale and nature of multi generational living in England and explored the opportunities that this presents to the house building sector.
Downsizing and moving in later life - new build housing or existing stock?
This research explored why older households move in later life, the size of property they moved to and why they choose either new build housing or existing stock. It considered what the house building sector can learn from their experience and what opportunities that this presents to the house building sector.
Evaluation of support services in Kingston Royal Eye Clinic
The Thomas Pocklington Trust undertook a pilot scheme to provide support to people attending the Royal Eye Clinic at Kingston hospital. The main purpose of this evaluation was to enable lessons to be learned from the pilot, to ensure that others can benefit from its experiences.
Managing Money Better: Evaluation
The Managing Money Better (MMB) project has been evaluated in order to analyse the outcomes for vulnerable older people using the service. The project aimed to reach more vulnerable older people, particularly by providing money advice as a key element of housing and care options advice and support.
Analysing the experience of vulnerable groups with hearing loss in Cambridgeshire
The first phase of the research identified several gaps in knowledge about particular groups within the D/deaf community and also identified gaps in services in Cambridgeshire. The second phase of the research therefore concentrated on these three issues: (1) Rural isolation amongst people with hearing loss; (2) Older people in care homes; (3) Advocacy services.
Value for money assessment of Lincolnshire Home Improvement Agency's housing options service
CCHPR was commissioned to undertake a simple value for money assessment of Linconshire's Home Improvement Agency's Housing Options advice service, to use in informing future funding for the service. Funding for the service has been provided by Lincolnshire County Council and FirstStop. CCHPR is conducting the evaluation of the national FirstStop information and advice service for older people.
Early support for sight loss in Essex: Evaluation
The Pocklington Trust commissioned CCHPR to evaluate the Visionary Development Fund’s project: Early Support in Essex. This project aimed to improve referral to services for elderly people with sight loss in Essex.
Evaluation of Stourbridge lighting intervention
The Thomas Pocklington Trust commissioned CCHPR to undertake an evaluation of lighting interventions on quality of life and, specifically, on its impact on reduction of falls amongst recipients based on a case study of a scheme in Stourbridge.
Evaluation of new lighting intervention schemes being undertaken by benevolent trusts
The Pocklington Trust commissioned CCHPR to undertake an evaluation of lighting interventions on quality of life and specifically on its impact on reduction of falls amongst recipients.
Dementia and sight loss: Developing social care practice in different housing settings
This project, funded by the National Institute for Health Research sought to develop best practice in social care and support for people with dementia and sight loss in a range of housing settings. The research was led by York University and CCHPR led the element of the study on the costs of care in different settings.
Housing wealth and wellbeing: understanding who uses housing equity release products and the impact they have on older people’s lives - scoping study
The UK has an ageing population, placing pressure on housing, health and social care services. Most older people own their homes outright and prefer to remain in the same home as they age, which often requires financial investment, e.g. to pay for home adaptations and care. One way to meet these costs is to release equity from the home. This can be done by moving house, but it can also be done without moving by using equity release products. However, this is a practice about which we know very little.
The role of the planning system in delivering housing choice for older Londoners
This project looked into the housing needs of older people in London for the Greater London Authority. It was commissioned as a ‘think piece’, looking specifically at the role of the planning system in helping to ensure that older Londoners have a genuine choice of homes that they can afford and which meet their requirements for different sizes and types of dwelling in the highest quality environments.
Cost benefit analysis of lighting adaptations
This project involved conducting a cost benefit analysis of lighting adaptations for the Thomas Pocklington Trust, a charity providing housing, care and support for people with sight loss in the UK. The output compares the costs of lighting adaptations to estimates of the costs of falls by elderly people resulting from poor lighting.
Evaluation of the FirstStop information and advice initiative
The Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research evaluated the FirstStop service information and advice service for older people for six years between 2009 and 2015.
Housing association rents and service charges for supported housing and housing for older people
Average housing association rents and service charges for the combined categories, supported housing and housing for older people, by local authority area were collected by the Housing Corporation for the first time in 2005. This project looked in detail at these figures.
Supported housing and housing for older people
The evaluation of the changes relating to Sheltered and Supported Housing will take place from September 2005 to the end of January 2006. The first stage will be a quantitative analysis clarifying whether the changes are as expected and therefore whether what has been asked for is what has been reported. This is particularly important in relation to the time series data. In the second stage, any evidence of significant differences will the analysed through interviews with relevant HAs. Depending on the problems encountered there will be a third stage involving a series of interviews with associations where major changes in categorisation have occurred and those who have experienced little change – to assess whether the new definitions reflect real differences; how demands vary between categories of housing; and housing association attitudes to the definitions now they have been operationalized.
Is co-living a housing solution for vulnerable older people?
Many vulnerable older people face related challenges around poor housing, poverty, loneliness and lack of support, which co-living housing models have the potential to address. The Nationwide Foundation and the Nationwide Building Society have funded CCHPR to conduct research in order to understand the benefits, risks and potential for scaling up of co-living models for vulnerable older people. Our research includes analysis of the complex and sometimes ambiguous legal and financial frameworks that can apply to such households.

Equality & Improving Outcomes

Residential trajectories of high-skilled transnational migrants in a global city: Exploring the housing choices of Russian and Italian professionals in London
A paper by Dr Sabina Maslova and Prof Russell King has been published in Cities.
The housing market and the wider economy
Our collaborative research programme for Places for People will take an in depth look at the housing market and the complexity of its relationship with society and the wider economy.
Creating positive economic communities
Funded by The Local Trust, Prof Pete Tyler and Dr Gemma Burgess led a team of researchers in reviewing how positive economic change might be sustainably created in communities with a population of 5,000 to 15,000, where there is sufficient local involvement and adequate long term support.
Developing income-linked rents for CHS Group
Joseph Rowntree Foundation and CHS Group have commissioned CCHPR to explore how CHS Group can set rents that are genuinely affordable for its clients. This research will inform CHS’s policy on rent setting beyond 2020 and, at this opportune time, provide an opportunity to influence sector thinking and relevant government policy.
Parenting in a house share (ESRC IAA)
Contract research for Commonweal Housing explored different types of shared housing available for non-resident parents and investigated their experiences of parenting their children whilst living in shared housing. This ESRC Impact Acceleration Account project will significantly increase the wider impact of this research, and will focus on the experience of fathers.
Evaluation of the Reimagining Rent Programme
The Young Foundation commissioned CCHPR to undertake an evaluation of the Reimagining Rent Programme, assessing its effectiveness in supporting participating innovations to grow and achieving wider impact.
Using incentives to improve the private rented sector for people in poverty
The Joseph Rowntree Foundation commissioned CCHPR to investigate how to improve the English private rented sector as a source of accommodation for people in poverty. The project explored whether taxation could be used to incentivise private landlords to improve the affordability, conditions or security of rented housing.
London Strategic Housing Initiative Evaluation
Trust for London and Citizens UK have commissioned CCHPR to undertake the evaluation of an initiative aimed at improving housing in London for citizens on low incomes.
The Case for Social Housing
Mike Oxley, Director of CCHPR, delivered a keynote lecture on The Case for Social Housing at UWA Perth's Social Impact Festival on 19 July 2017.
Building Better Opportunities - New Horizons
CCHPR has been commissioned to evaluate the New Horizons programme. New Horizons combines elements of financial inclusion, digital inclusion and employability delivered by employees hosted delivered from hubs in Peterborough, Wisbech, Kings Lynn and Cambridge with rural outreach. This project is funded by the European Social Fund and the National Lottery, through the Big Lottery Fund.
New housing, business space and infrastructure in London
This research was conducted in partnership with University College London (UCL).
Poverty, evictions and forced moves
This project was awarded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and supported by Shelter, in order to understand the causes of landlord evictions and of forced moves, where tenants feel compelled to move home for reasons such as affordability, security or to move away from particular locations. The final report was published in July 2017.
Understanding the likely poverty impacts of the extension of Right to Buy to housing association tenants
This short piece of research, commissioned by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation aimed to better understand likely poverty impacts of the extension of Right to Buy to housing associations and the associated sale of higher value local authority stock.
Research on the effect of rent stabilisation measures in London
The London Assembly’s Housing Committee undertook an investigation in autumn 2015 into the likely impact of a range of rent stabilisation measures on London’s housing market.
Evaluating the public health outcomes of the Cambridgeshire Time Credits Scheme
CCHPR's evaluation of the public health outcomes of the Cambridgeshire Time Credits project in Wisbech looked at the potential of the project to reduce health inequalities.
Evaluation of Visual Impairment Parliament in Kingston
The Thomas Pocklington Trust established a ‘Visual Impairment Parliament’ for people in Kingston living with Sight Loss. This research evaluated the process of setting up the parliament.
Sight loss is not life loss: Evaluation
The 'Sight Loss is not Life Loss' project was funded by the Big Lottery Fund. It aimed to help people with sight loss to achieve greater independence, to reduce social isolation and to have greater access to information, advice, support and specialist equipment. The aim of the proposed research was to provide an evaluation of the 'Sight Loss is not Life Loss' project with a focus on achievement of outputs, outcomes and client satisfaction.
ESRC Seminar Series on Marketplace Exclusion: Representations, Resistances and Responses
This series of six seminars examines substantive and methodological issues surrounding marketplace exclusion. The seminars are designed to create links between academics, early career researchers, business leaders, community groups, activists and policy makers interested in the dynamics of marketplace exclusion and means of countering it.
Managing Money Better: Evaluation
The Managing Money Better (MMB) project has been evaluated in order to analyse the outcomes for vulnerable older people using the service. The project aimed to reach more vulnerable older people, particularly by providing money advice as a key element of housing and care options advice and support.
Review of “Young people and housing: transitions, trajectories and generational fractures”
Mike Oxley provided a review of “Young people and housing: transitions, trajectories and generational fractures”, edited by Ray Forrest and Ngai ming Yip, for the International Journal of Housing Policy.
Analysing the experience of vulnerable groups with hearing loss in Cambridgeshire
The first phase of the research identified several gaps in knowledge about particular groups within the D/deaf community and also identified gaps in services in Cambridgeshire. The second phase of the research therefore concentrated on these three issues: (1) Rural isolation amongst people with hearing loss; (2) Older people in care homes; (3) Advocacy services.
An economic and spatial analysis of the future development of Wisbech in Cambridgeshire
This work aimed to assess: (1) The current economic profile of Wisbech; (2) The likely future economic role of Wisbech under different scenarios; (3) The sectors most likely to have potential for future employment growth; and to make (4) Make broad recommendations for future economic and spatial strategies to 2020.
Service use by Cambridgeshire deaf communities
This scoping study was undertaken as a tool for the D/deaf partnership to better understand its constituency, with a particular view to making an input into the revised Joint Strategic Needs Assessment.
Early support for sight loss in Essex: Evaluation
The Pocklington Trust commissioned CCHPR to evaluate the Visionary Development Fund’s project: Early Support in Essex. This project aimed to improve referral to services for elderly people with sight loss in Essex.
Unfinished business, building an effective safety net for home owners and the housing market
In 2012, the Government was looking to end temporary support measures for home-buyers that were introduced during the economic and housing market downturn, but there had been no progress on agreeing a more effective safety net for the future. This project was commissioned by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation in order to review the current safety net for home owners, how it might change in the light of government reforms and, looking to the future, whether a better and more sustainable safety net could be provided.
Building social capital through community timebanking: an evaluation of the Cambridgeshire timebanking project
Timebanking is an exchange system in which time is the principal currency. For every hour participants ‘deposit’ in a timebank, they are able to ‘withdraw’ an hour of support when they are in need. This research evaluated the development of a timebanking project in Cambridgeshire by Cambridgeshire County Council and the CHS Group.
Dementia and sight loss: Developing social care practice in different housing settings
This project, funded by the National Institute for Health Research sought to develop best practice in social care and support for people with dementia and sight loss in a range of housing settings. The research was led by York University and CCHPR led the element of the study on the costs of care in different settings.
Rural housing at a time of economic change
The Commission for Rural Communities funded CCHPR to carry out research into rural housing. The project looked specifically at the issues of changing rent levels and housing quality, the impact of policy change on rural areas, and whether some people are unable to remain in rural areas.
Book review by Dr Gemma Burgess published in Journal of Social Policy
Book review published in Journal of Social Policy. Dr Gemma Burgess reviews Patricia Kennett and Chan KamWah (eds.) (2011), Women and Housing: An International Analysis. Abingdon: Routledge. £34.99, pp. 247, pbk. doi:10.1017/S0047279411000882
The role of the planning system in delivering housing choice for older Londoners
This project looked into the housing needs of older people in London for the Greater London Authority. It was commissioned as a ‘think piece’, looking specifically at the role of the planning system in helping to ensure that older Londoners have a genuine choice of homes that they can afford and which meet their requirements for different sizes and types of dwelling in the highest quality environments.

Communities & Engagement

The citizen in regulation
This project for the Local Better Regulation Office reviewed the existing policy, practice and academic literature relating to the citizen in regulation, encompassing citizen involvement and participation, co-regulation and co-production. The intention was to highlight potentially fruitful areas for further exploration by the LBRO.

Living on the edge

Gemma Burgess and Lynne McAulay talk about the evaluation of the New Horizons project

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New papers published by CCHPR researchers

Oct 01, 2020

Housing Studies and the International Journal of Housing Policy have published papers by CCHPR researchers this month.

Jimmy's Cambridge release video of modular homes for local homeless people

Sep 09, 2020

This innovative project has seen the installation of six quality OSM units in Cambridge.

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