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Exclusive communities and anti-social housing: the failures of mixed community development: Fifth seminar in the ESRC Seminar Series on Marketplace Exclusion: Representations, Resistances and Responses

last modified Apr 21, 2015 11:23 AM
This seminar looked at the ways in which exclusion from the housing market is tackled in England and how successful the mixed communities policy has been. It reflected on the experiences of those excluded from the housing market, both in the UK and internationally.

This seminar looked at the ways in which exclusion from the housing market is tackled in England and how successful the mixed communities policy has been. It reflected on the experiences of those excluded from the housing market, both in the UK and internationally.

The seminar began with a short film about increasing the supply of affordable housing:

http://www.cchpr.landecon.cam.ac.uk/Projects/Start-Year/2014/Promoting-policy-change-to-boost-the-supply-of-affordable-housing/Affordable-Housing-Film

Dr Tony Manzi, Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, University of Westminster, reflected on the trajectory of mixed communities policy in his paper:

The Myth of the Mixed Community: Theoretical Assumptions, Policy Development and the Challenges of Housing Practice

Charlie Barlow, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge and Committee on Geographical Studies at the University of Chicago, discussed his research on residential segregation, socioeconomic inequalities and citizenship entitlements within inner-city neighbourhoods in Chicago in his presentation:

'You can't barbecue here!': when community and condominiums collide.

Dr Charlotte Lemanski, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, talked about her work on spatial segregation in South Africa in her paper:

Mixed-income housing in post-apartheid Cape Town: spaces of inclusion or exclusion?

Professor Jo Richardson, Centre for Comparative Housing Research, De Montfort University, reflected on her research with marginalised groups such as gypsies and travellers in her presentation:

Negotiated Home: using co-production research to enhance inclusion of Gypsy and Traveller communities

There was also a talk by the Cambridgeshire time banks initiative given by Wendy Lansdown, Cambridgeshire County Council, and Lucy Bird, Time Bank Coordinator. As part of their Timebanking in Cambridgeshire presentation they included this film:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9w04nDTvixA

For further information about the Cambridge seminar please contact Dr Gemma Burgess at glb36@cam.ac.uk

For more information about the seminar series please see http://www.liv.ac.uk/management/conferences-and-events/esrc/about/