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Evaluating the Public Health Outcomes of the Cambridgeshire Time Credits Project

This research analyses the public health outcomes of the Cambridgeshire Time Credits Project in Wisbech. It is a collaboration between the Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research (CCHPR) and the Cambridge Institute for Public Health (CIPH) .

The Cambridgeshire Time Credits programme is jointly funded by Cambridgeshire County Council and Cambridge Housing Society (CHS). It was set up in collaboration with Spice in July 2014. Spice is a social enterprise that supports the development of the Time Credit model in the UK http://www.justaddspice.org/.

Time Credits are a way of rewarding people for volunteering. Individuals give their time to a local organisation, community group, volunteer group or a statutory sector service provider. In exchange for their contribution, they ‘earn’ printed Time Credit notes, one for every hour they give, which they can then ‘spend’ on a range of leisure and other opportunities, typically  donated by organisations, local businesses and corporations to allow the community members to take advantage of their spare capacity.

The aim of the evaluation is to identify the potential of the Cambridgeshire Time Credit project in Wisbech to tackle social exclusion, loneliness and deprivation and to assess the extent to which it can reduce health inequalities.

This study was funded by the National Institute for Health Research’s School for Public Health Research (NIHR SPHR): sphr.nihr.ac.uk as part of the Public Health Practice Evaluation Scheme (PHPES).

Cambridgeshire Time Credits in Wisbech: three short films

As the project looking at the evaluation of public health outcomes of the Cambridgeshire Time Credits scheme in Wisbech drew to a close, three short films were released. Each of the films presents a different angle on the Cambridgeshire Time Credits case study in Wisbech.

Cambridgeshire Time Credits in Wisbech: three short films - Read More…

Time Credits Research Findings: Launch Event

Dr Gemma Burgess of CCHPR presented the findings of the evaluation of the public health outcomes of the Cambridgeshire Time Credits scheme at a launch at the University Centre, Granta Place in May 2017.

Time Credits Research Findings: Launch Event - Read More…

Festival of Ideas event - The potential for Time Credits to generate public health outcomes

‘Time Currencies in Cambridgeshire: Exchanging Time, Connecting Communities’ was held at the Festival of Ideas and attracted an audience of over 60 people who were keen to learn more about Time Credit and Timebank initiatives across Cambridgeshire. Dr Gemma Burgess presented findings from the evaluation of the public health outcomes of the Cambridgeshire Time Credits project in Wisbech (available to download).

Festival of Ideas event - The potential for Time Credits to generate public health outcomes - Read More…

Emerging findings paper 2 - Wisbech Time Credits Partner Organisation Case Studies

This report is the second of a series of papers on emerging findings from the evaluation. It draws on in depth face to face interviews with members of Time Credit partner organisations where people earn Time Credits. The case studies in this report summarise the stories of five Time Credit partner organisations.

Emerging findings paper 2 - Wisbech Time Credits Partner Organisation Case Studies - Read More…

Using Ethnographic Methodologies to Evaluate Time Credits – working paper

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the use of ethnographic methodologies to evaluate an initiative such as Time Credits.

Using Ethnographic Methodologies to Evaluate Time Credits – working paper - Read More…

Time Credits in Wisbech – working paper

The purpose of this paper is to describe the context in which the Time Credits programme operates.

Time Credits in Wisbech – working paper - Read More…

Wisbech Time Credits – Interim Report

This report presents the interim findings from the evaluation of the public health outcomes of the Cambridgeshire Time Credits project in Wisbech.

Wisbech Time Credits – Interim Report - Read More…

Wisbech Time Credits – individual member case studies

This report is the first of a series of papers on emerging findings from the evaluation. It draws on in depth face to face interviews with Time Credit members.

Wisbech Time Credits – individual member case studies - Read More…

The potential for Time Credits to generate public health outcomes – a conceptual model – working paper

This paper outlines how we expect the different activities associated with earning and spending Time Credits to generate public health outcomes and reduce health inequalities.

The potential for Time Credits to generate public health outcomes – a conceptual model – working paper - Read More…

Evaluating the Public Health Outcomes of the Cambridgeshire Time Credits Project – conference poster

This poster was presented at the School for Public Health Research annual conference about the evaluation of the public health outcomes of the Cambridgeshire Time Credits project in Wisbech.

Evaluating the Public Health Outcomes of the Cambridgeshire Time Credits Project – conference poster - Read More…

Co-production in research and public services – working papers

These two papers are outputs from the evaluation of the public health outcomes of the Cambridgeshire Time Credits project in Wisbech.

Co-production in research and public services – working papers - Read More…

Introduction to time banking and time credits

The first working paper of the evaluation of the public health outcomes of the Cambridgeshire Time Credits project in Wisbech has just been published. It provides an overview of time banking and time credits. Part of the NIHR funded Public Health Practice Evaluation Scheme (PHPES), the aim of the evaluation is to determine the project’s potential to tackle social exclusion, loneliness and deprivation and to assess the extent to which it can reduce health inequalities.

Introduction to time banking and time credits - Read More…

CCHPR Contact

Funder

National Institute for Health Research School for Public Health Research

Project Start Date

July 2015